How to Use Book Trailers for Successful Book Marketing

Design consultant and ALLi Partner Member Aimee Coveney considers the benefits of video book trailers to promote self-published books, shares top tips on how to make them, and offers eight ways to put them to good use.

Video media is causing quite a stir in today’s book industry. Online promotion is highly effective in reaching a wide audience, and sharable media, such as videos, play a key role in gaining attention for many professionals. With that being the case, video media and, subsequently, book trailers have become increasingly popular amongst readers, authors and publishers. They are however, still held with some scepticism, many claiming they are simply ‘author bling’. This is due mostly to the amount of poorly produced examples there are, and the lack of knowledge in creating that buzz.

  • Some authors and readers feel strongly that book trailers invade on an otherwise traditional medium of words and imagination.
  • On the other hand, video is a proven method of marketing, and authors need to cater for all readers, both traditional and those that embrace the shift into a digital reading age.

What’s the Point of Book Trailers?

Book trailers bring your work to life in a way that many authors dream about during the writing process. With visual elements on the internet bringing in far more interaction than those websites without, book trailers can now play a huge role in your online platform.

The elements of your book trailer should be striking and professional. Images, video footage and music can be sourced online, although it is imperative to ensure they are appropriate for your work. Having a well-thought-out script, and putting these elements together effectively, is key. Having image and text appear one after the other can appear lacklustre and outdated. Smooth and creative effects are vital in creating a professional finish.

If you’re not able to employ a professional, ensure you watch other successful book or movie trailers to get a sense of how they are put together.

How Long Should a Book Trailer Be?

Duration is significant. Many authors are very passionate and have a lot that they wish to include. The longer the video, however, the less likely it is that people will watch to completion, and they may even lose interest. A length of between one and one and a half minutes is about right.

Eight Ways to Use Your Book Trailer

Once you have a completed book trailer. it is imperative to distribute it effectively. A professional should let you know if this is included in their service.

  • Uploading your video to Youtube is only the first step. When uploading, be sure to include keyword tags, a clear title and description  so that your video is easy to find.
  • Having your book trailer on your website home page can also increase the length of time visitors remain on your site by up to 88%.
  • Sharing via social media is also effective, as many of your existing readers will have already connected with you through these channels, and the shareable nature of videos makes it very easy for others to spread the word for you.
  • Keep it visible during promotion by pinning it to the top of your social media pages.
  • Amazon and Goodreeds will also allow you to upload a book trailer directly onto your author profile and book’s page, meaning you have further means to capture reader’s attention.
  • There are also book trailer dedicated websites including www.bookreels.com that drive traffic to specific genres.
  • You need to think strategically about placing the trailer on sites where your book-buyers frequent. If you have articles or a blog tour where you can increase the chances of your book trailer being seen and shared, be sure to let the site owners know that they can embed the book trailer to gather interest.
  • Lastly, if your existing books are available on Kindle, you can easily include a link to your book trailers at the end, tempting readers to immediately purchase the next in the series or your most recent offering.

A good book trailer should not tell the entire contents of the book. Instead it should create suspense and visually stimulate the reader, enticing them to make a purchase, or at the very least, keep them interested in your work in the future. This growth in book trailers is allowing authors to reach a widening audience, and keeping your name visible in an overcrowded market.

OVER TO YOU What’s your experience been of book trailers – good or bad? Do you have great tips to share? We’d love to know!

 

Article originally posted at http://www.selfpublishingadvice.org/how-to-use-book-trailers-for-successful-book-marketing/?platform=hootsuite

Book Trailers and Video Media – Why They Are Increasingly Effective

Over the last decade the internet, how we use it and when we use it has changed dramatically, and this has meant that every industry across the world has had to adjust. The publishing industry has been no exception. In fact, as an industry that relies heavily on appearance and technology itself, it has had to be more vigilant than others in order to keep up with digital modifications. Even over the last few years, huge changes have meant that publishing in the digital world has become even easier, but making a success of your work is just as challenging as ever.

Online promotion can be one of the least expensive, but most effective tools that any writer can utilise in what has become an overcrowded marketplace. The issue is that in today’s online book sector, there is a narrowing timeframe in order to generate interest in your work. In a world where people visit websites whilst shopping, scroll through social media during television adverts or read a blog on their way home from work, everyone is increasingly busy and increasingly impatient. Nowadays information needs to be delivered in a much more exciting, interactive manner, and most importantly, fast.

With that being the case, video media and subsequently, book trailers, have become more and more popular, but are still unbelievably held with some skepticism, and that is due mostly by the amount of poorly produced examples there are being shared online. Many authors with little design or production skills put simple slideshows together themselves, or have friends or fans send them in. This gives many authors the advantage of still being able to stand out from the crowd with a professional video.

Book trailers bring your work to life in a way that many authors often dream about. They can also give readers a great impression of professionalism and much like a movie trailer, is designed to visually stimulate. With visual elements on the internet bringing in far more attention than those websites without, book trailers can now play a huge role in your visibility online, and its ultimate success. It has been found that statistically the average internet user will remain on a website around eighty percent longer if there is a video to view. Videos have also seen the largest rise as a piece of sharable media, meaning your book trailer can be shared all over the world 24/7. If you are having trouble conveying the message of your book, or gaining the attention you feel it deserves, a book trailer may be a good option to explore.

Part of the reason why information online needs to be delivered in a different methods now, is due to the varying way internet browsers are viewing the web. An ever increasing amount of people browse via their mobile phones and tablet devices, meaning your page of text just became too daunting and perhaps too small to read. Book trailers are great ways to gain instant attention, tempting visitors to look further and stay longer. Most readers won’t fully read the lengthy reviews and information that some websites try to share online. Instead, they want snappy information delivered with greater ease. These visitors therefore need to be fed details in a much more graphic medium, without inundating them with text, and that is why book trailers and video media are still on the rise.

There are other options for video media apart from book trailers that authors can also consider. Anything from website introductions, readings, interviews or announcements can create an interactive feel and convert information into sales.

Website introductions are just that, a short video, usually featuring the author, welcoming visitors to their website and speaking about their work. This can replace, or work alongside the text that usually appears on a website home page, giving visitors the option. Videos of this nature, much like book trailers should be around one minute in length. At that length, a video receives the highest amount of viewers watching until completion. One minute sounds like a very short window in order to get your message across, but you will be amazed how much can be communicated in this time. This type of video media also has an added bonus of ‘meeting’ the author, which readers have always admitted to being intrigued about. Being able to put a face to the name and making your brand and website memorable has huge advantages for any future work, tempting visitors back again and again. And remember, it’s not just your website that can utilise video media; it can be shared across your entire online platform, including social media, as well as being played at book launches or other events. Approximately sixty-four percent of consumers are more likely to buy a product after watching video promotion, with marketing professionals reporting that video converts better than any other medium.

There are many versions of book trailers, interviews or other forms of video media out there that have been put together poorly and unprofessionally, and like any piece of promotion, it needs to remain professional in order to gain the right attention and not deter from your work. It need not be expensive either; a professional book trailer varies in price, but something effective can be found for as little as £95. However not all companies that offer the service maintain a high quality, so be sure to view some samples of their previous work and discuss any requirements prior to instructing anyone.

This explosive growth in video popularity is allowing authors to reach a huge audience, deepening that all important connection between author and reader and keeping your name at the forefront of their consideration.

This article was originally published on the Bloomsbury Writers’ and Artists’ Yearbook website at https://www.writersandartists.co.uk/writers/advice/901/self-publishing/marketing-and-publicity/

How Your Online Platform Can Take You From Self-Published to Securing a Major Publishing Deal

2BE7EDDB00000578-3219546-image-m-9_1441198840264You may remember a month or so ago, a children’s book made headlines, claiming to guarantee sending your children to sleep at bedtime, and today, it has made headlines again, after it was announced that Penguin Random House have snapped it up, and is due for release in October.

Author, Carl-Johan Forssen’s story, The Rabbit Who Wants to Fall Asleep, started its journey as a self-published book, which was translated into English last year, using Amazon’s self-publishing system, Createspace. After reaching No.10 on the Amazon book chart, it began at times outselling high-profile titles such as Go Set a Watchman and Grey.

Many writers now start out as indie authors, either consciously or not, hoping a major publishing house may pick up their work after the success of ‘going it alone’. Whether you admit it or not, it’s every writers dream to have their work read by a wider audience. Today’s news seems to reiterate the point that I make on a regular basis, that mainstream publishing houses are clearly listening to what the market is doing, even outside the bigger works.

The managing director of Penguin Random House Children’s UK, Francesca Dow, said in a statement: ‘We’re thrilled to be publishing The Rabbit Who Wants to Fall Asleep—a phenomenon that’s grabbing people’s attention all around the world.

‘We are excited now to be bringing this book to an even bigger audience here in the UK and internationally.

‘As a publisher we want to publish books that speak to people and have the power to support them.

‘This book is very clearly doing that.’

I have seen many authors wanting to achieve this dream, only to fall at the last hurdle for one reason or another. When speaking with authors at events, many are surprised to hear that agents and publishers may research them online prior to making any offers. It’s easier than you may think for publishers and agents to find your details and review how you interact with your audience. This can be done over social media, via interviews, or looking at your own website. This is a vital reason why your online platform should display outward professionalism and encourage the confidence of not just readers, but clearly industry professionals too. If you do not have a website or an online presence at all, publishers and agents can view this as a significant negative against your name. It will take more work in marketing terms to publicise you and your work if you refuse to embrace what is probably the least expensive, but most effective platform for publicity in today’s market.

It also means that publishers or agents may find it extremely difficult to even find your contact details in order to discuss future opportunities with you. The publishing industry is no longer simply about sending in submissions and waiting to hear back. This story demonstrates how the professionals are keeping their ear to the ground and seeking out future titles. If you cannot be easily found, you may be missing out on advancing your writing career.

If you look at Carl-Johan Forssen’s website you will see a very well presented site that immediately conveys legitimacy and professionalism in his field of work. We don’t know whether Random House took note of his online platform or not, but it would have certainly added to their confidence in him as a professional and an author if they had.

It’s never too early to assess whether you could present yourself more effectively online, and if you’re looking for advice or a friendly critique, please get in touch by email (contact@authordesignstudio.com) or via Twitter (@authordesigner).

8 Proven Ways to Attract More Visits to Your Author Website

WOMANThere is a myth floating in the minds of some writers out there, that once you have written the book and built your author website that the book will sell like hot cakes and you can sit back and simply enjoy the praise. Unfortunately this is not the case, and as an Indie author, it is down to you to market and push your book to reach its potential in what is a very overcrowded marketplace.

There are many tools online to help you achieve this, and with the bonus of social media and an author website, you can reach a market that would be impossible to reach in isolation. That being said, you need to make the most of what is possibly the best marketing tool you have. An author website is dedicated to you and your work. There is no competition and you can design it to attract your target market and update it as and when you need to. It should appear much like a ‘bonus DVD’, in that it offers information and ‘extras’ that cannot be found elsewhere. So to help you continue on the path to author success, here are 8 easy and proven ways to attract more visits (and repeat visitors) to your author website.

1. Deleted Scenes

Do you remember that really laborious editing process, where you deleted entire scenes that you may have realised weren’t entirely necessary? Well, don’t waste them! Put them aside, and once readers have finished your book, you can offer these ‘deleted scenes’ online to prolong their interest in your work.

2. Alternate Endings

Much like the deleted scenes, you may have tried several endings before deciding on the final edit. These can be really interesting for readers to see. If you’ve always had the same ending, why not have some fun yourself and write something totally different!

3. Short Stories

When a reader finds an author they really connect with and enjoy, they like to keep an eye on new and upcoming books. But of course writing a full book takes some time to complete, so why not keep their interest by offering an ‘interim’ story? It can be something completely different, or you can even include ‘spin-offs’ from existing characters. You can even theme them to different seasons. Imagining your characters around the Christmas season, or even taking a holiday.

A high percentage of readers admit that they visit author websites to read the free material, so why not take advantage and add it as a bonus for subscribing to a newsletter or similar? One thing to remember is that your short stories need to be edited to the same quality as your published works, otherwise you may put your readership off.

4. Exclusive Signed Copies of Your Book

One thing that Amazon (and other large retailers) cannot offer is a signed copy of your work. If you sell your books direct via your website, why not entice them to order from you rather than the easier option of a large online retailer and offer exclusive autographed copies of your book? Autographed copies make great gifts too.

5. Character Catch-up’s

This is something I came across when working with a children’s author. He very cleverly posted a transcript piece of his characters ‘chatting’ to him about the book and story. The author ‘interviewed’ them about different aspects of the events in the story. It was a very clever way of reiterating the important morals in his work, and very entertaining for his readers.

6. Competitions and Quizzes

Everyone likes to win at something, and if you have your reader’s attention on your website, then a competition to win a quiz or perhaps a competition in order to win something is an ideal way to gain contacts. You can even integrate this with your social media and offer a free signed copy of your book if the person ‘follows’ you on social media etc. It’s a great way to build interest and create a buzz around your website. It doesn’t need to be limited to your book though. You can offer book vouchers, or even something related to the book. One author I worked with recently gave away a necklace which featured on her book cover.

7. Articles

Everyone’s work speaks of some kind of experience or expertise, and this can be another way of reaching out to your audience. Whether you write fiction or non fiction, you can write articles about the topics of your work and knowledge. If there is no real ‘topic’ to discuss, why not talk about your writing journey, what you learnt along the way or even what research you performed in order to make your work accurate. One author I have worked with, who writes historical romance, creates mood boards for each book, including pictures of historic rooms and places, a map of the area where the book is based and portraits that suit the character she is trying to portray. Showing this to your readers can further build that author/reader connection.

8. Featured Reviews

If you’re gaining a good number of reviews, you could create a ‘featured review’ area, and encourage readers to send their thoughts by attracting them with a prize. At the end of each month you can announce a winner and ‘feature’ their review on your website and across your social media accounts.

I hope these hints and tips will help you attract more visitors to your website, but I’m always happy to hear more of your ideas. What do you do to gain website visitors? You can comment here or tweet me at @authordesigner with your experiences.

15 Great and Easy Ways to Promote Your Book Online

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There is one question in the publishing universe that has, and always will linger on author’s minds; how to promote and sell more books. With the publishing world changing continuously, marketing has had to evolve very quickly alongside it, with the eBook meaning the most dramatic changes publishing has ever seen. Whereas before, books were printed, launched with a grand launch party and then left to sell of its own back until the print run was sold-out, eBooks will now stay ‘in-print’ for far longer, and therefore an author’s promotion needs to be longer lasting and more accessible.

Promotion can be expensive, and can out-date fairly quickly. This is why online promo is so popular with all authors, be it mainstream or self-publsihed. Not only can it reach a far wider audience than an author could ever hope to achieve in isolation, it is easily ‘updatable’. If you refuse to dive into the online marketing world, you are essentially cutting off the main artery to your audience.

That being said, here is a list of fantastic ideas to get your book promoted online. Some are an investment but a lot are free.

1. Build a Professional Author Website – not only can it be designed solely around you and your work, which means attracting your readers, but it acts as the central base for all online promotion to lead to, allowing you to gain your target audience’s attention and then sell sell sell.

2. Set Up Twitter & Facebook Accounts – you may dislike it or simply not understand it yet, but interacting with readers on social media is a sure-fire way to reach potential readers in real-time, giving them the most up-to-date information possible. Have a 24 hour giveaway competition, or perhaps your book is on special offer for a short time? Then this is the place to tell everyone about it.

3. Set Up a Blog – If writing is your passion, why not blog about it? Readers, other authors and the industry in general are all interested in your writing journey. You can blog about the process of writing, the topics in your books or general life as an author, giving your readers a ‘human touch’ to your work.

4. Goodreads Giveaway – A freebie is a great way to gain interest and reviews of your work. Doing a giveaway on Goodreads means gaining interest from a wider reading audience which you may not have access to on your own. You need to be approved as an author by Goodreads, but this is well worth the effort.

5. Interact on Social Media – Commenting and replying on posts that are related to the topics in your book, or on writing can be a great way to gain a reputation as an expert in your genre and industry.

6. Free Excerpts – Posting free extracts of your book online (on your website is ideal) can give readers a great taster of your work. Adding a link at the end of each extract to buy your book makes it incredibly easy for readers to buy the whole book there and then.

7. Book Trailer – Make or ask a professional to build a book trailer. Visual promotion is far more popular than any other in today’s market and can hold potential reader’s attention for longer than static content. When done properly, a book trailer can also create an impression of professionalism and can be used across many online platforms.

8. ‘How-to’ Videos – If your book has a theme or topic that can be discussed in depth, create some ‘how-to’ or discussion videos for readers who have finished your book,or to entice those who haven’t yet.

9. Newsletter Sign-up – Embed a newsletter sign-up form on your website so that interested readers can receive periodical emails with your latest news. Interestingly newsletters have gone out of fashion in recent years, with too many junk emails clogging up people’s inbox’s. However, your name appearing in their inbox from time to time (whether they open the email or not) is enough to create a strong familiarity, so when they are looking for a new book, they may just look you up.

10. Guest Blog Posts – Whether these are interviews or discussions on your latest book, ensure you include a link back to your website where readers can gain more information and the all important retail links.

11.  Website URL – As mentioned in the above point, adding your website address wherever possible will mean a far higher chance of potential readers buying your book. Place a link to your website in your email signature too, along with any awards, nominations or other ‘selling’ statuses. The more places your website is listed online, the better your SEO (Search Engine Optimism) will also become.

12. Reader Photos – Ask readers to send you photos of them reading your book. This can create a lot of fun competition. I have seen images of people reading on the edge of mountains, in pools or hanging from trees! This can be a great piece of promo for children’s authors. Once you have these you can post the best on social media and your website. Perhaps run a competition for the best photo?

13. Taster Readings – There were days when readers would gather in a library or bookshop for an author reading, but this is not always possible for every author. Why not create videos/podcasts of yourself reading taster sections of your book that you can display online.

14. Run a Virtual Book Tour – Just like guest blogging, you can run a virtual book tour, enabling you to get your book infront of readers across the world. Find and agree with half a dozen to a dozen blogs or websites that are happy to receive you, to discuss your books. Offering exclusives, such as giveaways, question and answer sessions or free excerpts can entice readers to ‘follow’ you across the internet from website to website – just remember to mention where you’ll be appearing next either on your website, or if they are happy to do so, the end of each guest tour post.

15.  Online Campaigning – Create a hum around your book. If it’s personal, which others may benefit from reading, whether your book or from listening to your journey, ensure you tell everyone about it. I know many authors who write to conquer depression, or write about illness that either they or their family has suffered in order to just get through the day. Some may call it the ‘sob-story’ tactic, but I call it giving a voice to your personal battles or those of others.

Obviously not everyone can manage all of these, but concentrating on just a few can show you a significant difference in not only sales (although they are important) but to general interest in your work. Try them out and let us all know how you get on!